RIAA Takes on Porn Industry

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) recently filed suit with several porn companies in order to stop the unauthorized use of music in their videos and sites.  As much porn as I have seen, I can’t remember any that had a known song in it (I have some known musician friends who have made music for it though!). As a music executive who has seen some crazy stuff, we have no moral high ground, and in business, we could probably learn something from the adult entertainment world which has embraced technology pretty successfully.

After an exhaustive search, I managed to uncover one “porn” video featuring a known record, and it was an erotic dancer using Aerosmith’s classic “Dream On.”  Of course, it would have to be a band from the “American Invasion,” or the 70s response to the British Invasion that included a stream of lesser groups that rode the commercial wave of rock as children of boomers bought expensive component stereos, invented concert t shirts, picture discs and everything associated with the music became more corporate – chain record stores, researched radio stations, etc.

In a similarly scientific way, porn sites must be using music to cater to a certain part of the population.  The fact that the woman is wearing a shirt from Rackspace (a server technology company) implies that they made this video and planted it around the web to promote themselves to porn users (MEN).  

Based on what I have seen of the culture of that company, I’m not surprised (fake tattoo sleeves look pretty weird on Robert Scoble at SXSW, but you did get me to notice!). My guess is those folks are not above using strippers to attract customers, and why not abuse Aerosmith along the way?

RIAA, go get ’em.

NSFW: Rackspace’s “Dream On” Video after the jump


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Maybe it’s just my age, but I blame Kiss and other American Classic Rock with spawning “Hair Metal” and institutionalizing a set of values that would be overturned in large headline letters in the early 90s by Nirvana. They were soon followed by more conventional groups who were less threatening to these fans (Soundgarden, Pearl Jam and especially Stone Temple Pilots/Bush).

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